PRINT IT

How to Penetrate the World of Museum Exhibit Designs

How to Penetrate the World of Museum Exhibit Designs

A museum can be a truly magical place. Think about it as a place where great inspirations have materialized and come to life visually. Museums can simultaneously entertain and educate, making them a favorite for educators worldwide. Behind the scenes, a lot of expertise, creativity and hard work is needed for each and every display. They are created by highly-skilled professionals who have spent years honing their craft. For them, coming up with a great museum exhibit design and then seeing it through to final production is incredibly fulfilling, although often fraught with the pressure of meeting deadlines that cannot be shifted. There’s even a specialty MA degree in exhibition design now offered at George Washington University.

 

3D printed dinosaur
3D printed by Composite Images

The truth is, print shops and prop makers claim that there has been increasing interest for large format 3D printing from museums and galleries. This makes a lot of sense, since there are numerous advantages that 3D printing brings, specifically the ability to fabricate one-off projects at a reasonable cost, significantly reduced turnover times compared with traditional fabrication processes, and new realms in terms of creative freedom.

 

3D printed astronaut
3D printed by Adaequo

 

Turning a curator’s or designer’s vision into a reality can no doubt be challenging. So how does one go about building a great museum exhibit? We dove into the topic ourselves, and here’s what we found.

Phase 1: The Concept and Vision

A display or exhibit can be about science, history, art, or archeology. Yet the implementation and form need to be geared towards a designated target audience and age group. Thought must also be given to the required level of interactivity. How can you best engage with the personas that the museum aims to reach out to?

 

 

 

In the case of this 10-foot (3-meter) tall dinosaur, the aim of the museum was to attract train commuters to a new paleontology exhibition at the Musée National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris. It was decided to start promoting it at the closest train station. Looking for a way to produce a life-size Triceratops with authentic, intricate scales and features, the museum turned to large format 3D printing to create this massive beast. It was so effective and realistic that it caught the eye of all passersby. Print shop, Metropole, used the size of their Massivit 3D printer to their advantage for this undertaking, and the resulting authenticity demonstrated that any finish is truly possible, in this case, bringing an extinct species to life.

 

3D printed by Baicheng

Making an exhibit interactive or dynamic in some way generally leaves a far greater impact on visitors. Lights, illumination, sensor triggers, or augmented reality features are sensory mainstays. They appeal to any audience and can effectively draw visitors’ attention to a particular part of an exhibit at a particular moment.

 

Large 3D printed displays can easily integrate interactive features. So it’s important to take these capabilities into account when designing or creating a museum exhibit.

 

Assuming the storyline, background context, and educational content have been defined, any featured animal, prop, or setting can be fabricated digitally, meaning the end result will precisely replicate the design. Today’s technology means you can either scan a physical object with a 3D scanner or design it from scratch in CAD software such as ZBrush or Rhino. What you see on the screen is what emerges straight out of the 3D printer, within hours.

3D printed by Sismaitalia

Making an exhibit interactive or dynamic in some way generally leaves a far greater impact on visitors. Lights, illumination, sensor triggers, or augmented reality features are sensory mainstays that appeal to any audience and can effectively draw visitors’ attention to a particular part of an exhibit at a particular moment. Large 3D printed displays can easily integrate interactive features, so it’s important to take these capabilities into account when designing or creating a museum exhibit.

 

 

Phase 2: Production

3D printed by Baicheng

One of the key reasons why it has become popular to create museum exhibits with large format 3D printers like the Massivit 1800, is the speed at which projects can be delivered, from design through implementation. Being that fabricators are regularly presented with short deadlines, large 3D printers are often the only realistic option.

 

Phase 3: Installation and Logistics

 

Another big advantage to using a Massivit large format 3D printer is that the parts are 3D printed hollow. From the start, they are light and yet strong. This helps with transportation and logistical considerations. It also allows for last-minute changes in the final context, as parts can easily be moved around. Producing hollow models and displays also enables more control over the degree of internal illumination.

 

3d printed mermaid
3D printed by Media Resources

Phase 4: The Unveiling

3D printed by Sismaitalia

Once your clients know they’re able to incorporate an augmented reality app or social media hashtags into their visitors’ journey, they’re sure to want to leverage these marketing and engagement tactics, so it’s important to expose them to it at the start.

These features can also be planned for the launch of the museum exhibit to attract more visitors. Your job is to ensure your potential clients know the full range of creative possibilities and that you are fully equipped to hit their deadlines.

To find out more about how large format 3D printing is helping print shops win projects across multiple verticals, contact Massivit 3D for a chat.  To read more, scroll down.

 

 

 

 

Please rate it
LEAVE A COMMENT

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR BLOG
To get an update when we post a new blog...
We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Privacy Policy.
Accept Cookies remove